CJS - Criminal Justice

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Note: Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems is a prerequisite for all other Criminal Justice courses. Admission into certain criminal justice courses without this prerequisite is at the discretion of the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator.

Contents

CJS 1001 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

4 Credits

This course provides an overview of the American criminal justice system, emphasizing the three system components; the police, the courts, and corrections. Topics will include the role of police in a democratic society, the relationship of the various courts within the system, the processes of punishment and rehabilitation, and the roles and interactions of the Federal and State systems of criminal justice.

CJS 1002 - Careers in the Criminal Justice System

4 Credits

This course provides a thorough overview of career opportunities within the field of criminal justice. A wide range of occupations that demand very different levels of experience and education will be examined. Working professionals representing a wide range of career fields will introduce students to local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, corrections, probation, parole, forensics, court systems, victim/witness services, counseling positions, and other special government opportunities. Topics covered for all employment positions will include educational requirements, entry requirements, training processes, career development paths, salary and benefit ranges, and present employment opportunities

CJS 2001 - Community Policing

4 Credits

This course reviews the organizational and operational philosophy of community policing and the manner is which it develops a partnership between the police and the community they serve. Emphasis is on the process of improving the “quality of life in a community through problem-solving for the long-term perspective. Topics include the study of the origins of community policing, problem-oriented policing, the role of the police in society, the role of the community in crime prevention, and methods for the implementation and evaluation of the community policing philosophy.

CJS 2005 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

4 Credits

This course assumes an understanding of the American criminal justice system and examines and compares criminal justice systems from around the world. An analysis of the governmental, legal, police, courts, and corrections operations of each country will be undertaken. Countries analyzed include Canada, China, France, Japan, Russia, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

CJS 2010 - Corrections, Probation and Parole

4 Credits

This course will study the convicted criminal defendant of the criminal justice system in the post-conviction setting. Areas explored will include the development and use of probation and parole as correctional alternatives to incarceration, the evolution of the correctional system, the relationship of the prison administration and the other components of the criminal justice system, and the operations of the correctional system and its impact on punishment and rehabilitation.

CJS 2015 - Crime Scene Photography

4 Credits

This course provides an examination of the latest methods and techniques of photographic documentation of a crime scene, a victim, a suspect, and criminal evidence. Usages of photography in criminal surveillance operations is also addressed. Topics will include the fundamentals of photographing a crime scene from general to specific. Practical exercises will demonstrate methods for documenting various types of crime scenes.

CJS 2020 - Criminal Law and Criminal Procedural

4 Credits

This course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of substantive criminal law and its procedural aspects as a means of social control, particularly relating to the constitutionally protected rights of the accused in the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be on the elements of the law and the applicable penalties, as well as the procedures that must be followed in applying the law, and on the court system as a social institution with the interacting roles of judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and defendants.

CJS 2025 - Criminal Investigation

4 Credits

This course provides an overall view of the techniques involved in investigating crimes, basic interviewing of victims and witnesses, identifying and questioning suspects, organizing investigations. Specific topics covered are crime scene procedures, searches, surveillance, sources of information, use of scientific aids, recognition of evidence, and ethics in criminal investigations. The course is designed to provide a foundation of criminal investigation procedures and techniques. Emphasis is on a logical scientific approach to crime scene investigations since investigation is in large part a science. Through discussion and hands-on exercises the student practices the application of the scientific method to criminal investigations. Students will be exposed to actual criminal investigations and processes through lectures, slides, videos, and reviews of actual past cases.

CJS 2030 - Fire and Arson Investigation

4 Credits

This course is an entry-level study of fire science, standards, laws, and guidelines for proper fire scene investigation. Topics studied include fire science, arson laws and evidence, organic chemistry, fire investigation methodology, and scientific arson investigation.

CJS 2035 - Forensic Science

4 Credits

This course will introduce the student to the role of the forensic examiner in the identification, collection, scientific analysis, and court presentation of evidence gathered during the criminal investigation. The student will become familiar with the many applications of science to law, such as: physical fibers; drugs; forensic toxicology; serology; DNA; fingerprints; and forensic science and the internet. The classroom will be supported by hands-on laboratory work which will enhance class lectures and discussions.
Requirements: Sophomore Standing and Criminal Justice Major – Other students may enroll in this course when seats are available and with the approval of the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator.

CJS 2040 - Introduction to Law Enforcement

4 Credits

This course examines law enforcement agencies and their roles, functions, history, and how they developed within the field of Criminal Justice. Additionally, the course gives an overview of the components of the law enforcement profession; namely the evolution of law enforcement, contemporary law enforcement, challenges to the profession, and law enforcement and the criminal justice system. Examines law reviews the structure and function of law enforcement agencies in the United States at the state, local, and federal levels. Differences between levels, as well as current issues and problems facing law enforcement administrators are emphasized.

CJS 2045 - Juvenile Justice and School Resources

4 Credits

This course examines patterns of delinquent behavior among youth. The definition and measurement of delinquency, influence of kinship, educational, and other institutions on delinquency, social class and subcultural influences on delinquency, identification and processing of delinquents by official control agencies. Additionally, the course will study the problem of school violence and analyze the correlation and impact of the media, community, and family upon such violence. Identification and intervention approaches to working with out-of-control behaviors will be explored.

CJS 2050 - Laws of Criminal Evidence

4 Credits

This course examines those rules of evidence and procedures of particular importance to the operational level of criminal justice agencies. Topics will include the evolution of the laws of evidence, the trial process, hearsay, confessions and admissions, pretrial investigation and identification procedures, expert and lay opinion, scientific evidence, character evidence, and presumptions. Emphasis will be given to the study and evaluation of kinds of evidence, tests of admissibility, competence of witnesses, and privileged and non-privileged communication.

CJS 2055 - Organized Crime and Gang Organizations

4 Credits

This course will examine the topic of organized crime, its emergence in American Society, its activities, and its relationship to other principal social institutions and components of the criminal justice system. It will include a consideration of the historical economic, social, legal, and political events that led to the generation of organized crime. There will be a review of the precedents of organized crime and its history; the relationship of organized crime to federal, state, and local politics; the activities of organized crime figures; policies designed to combat organized crime; and some explanations for the persistence of organized crime. Also included will be a consideration of the new groups and forms of organized crime. In addition, the history of gangs and gang violence in society, gangs as organized crime groups, and the present-day problem of gangs will be examined.

CJS 2060 - Victimology, Domestic Violence and Victim Witness Services

4 Credits

This course provides an extensive overview of the principles and concepts of victimology, an analysis of victimization patterns and trends, and theoretical reasoning and responses to criminal victimization. In addition, this course explores the role of victimology in the criminal justice system, examining the consequences of victimization and the various remedies now available for victims. Additionally, the societal problem of domestic violence will be studied. The history of domestic violence in modern America and the societal and legal response to this problem will be examined, as well as the history and current status of the various available Victim Witness Services.

CJS 2065 - White Collar Crime and Fraud Investigation

4 Credits

This course covers the theoretical explanations for white-collar crime committed by individual offenders and corporations. Areas of study include fraud, money laundering, embezzlement, bribery, insurance and healthcare fraud, identity theft, internet crimes, terrorism, and software piracy. Students study the extent and costs of these crimes, victim and offender profiles, and corporate liability.

CJS 2070 Policing the Police

4 Credits
Allegations of police misconduct have a dramatic and often alarming ripple effect on agencies and their entire community. This course is designed as a professional development course that will enhance a student’s abilities, while guiding participants through the various stages of an internal affairs investigation and the myriad issues associated with them, from the initial surfacing of allegations, to the filing of a report, and the launch of a hearing.


CJS 3001 - Criminology

4 Credits

The course examines the patterns, causes, and consequences of crime, and the ways in which the criminal justice system attempts to deal with the crime problem in the United States. Topics include characteristics of offenders, patterns of criminal behavior, theories of crime causation, and social forces affecting crime and criminal justice.

CJS 3005 - Crisis Intervention in Public Safety

4 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with an in-depth exposure to the principles and practices of effective crisis intervention. The student examines the theory and methods of crisis intervention. Particular attention is given to the various contemporary techniques of intervention and resolution. Assessment techniques used in the intervention process are explored. Topics include characteristics of crises, intervention strategies, specific techniques for intervening in various crisis situations, and community crisis support services.

CJS 3010 - Death Investigation

4 Credits

This course examines the many duties of a criminal investigator at a death scene that will lead to a successful completion of a criminal investigation. The student will develop an understanding of the legal responsibilities and requirements of a death scene investigator, how to secure a crime scene, identification and collection of evidence, identification of the victim, identification of the cause and manner of death, methods for interviewing witnesses, procedures for establishing time of death, techniques for obtaining statements and confessions, procedures for following up of leads, and case preparation procedures for trial.

CJS 3015 - Interview & Interrogation and Arrest, Search & Seizure

4 Credits

This course will familiarize students with the various techniques for “detecting deception.” Topics will include verbal and non-verbal communications, physiological responses, multiple suspect elimination, the interrogation process and legal aspects associated with admissions, confessions, and written, audio and video statements.

CJS 3020 - Leadership for Police Field Commanders

4 Credits

This course explores contemporary management theory and practice in the context of management of police organizations. Emphasis is placed on command of emergent field operations and management of crime scenes. Analysis will include the police organization as a dynamic social system and the behavior and social skills required of a police commander to deal effectively with a rapidly changing investigation or situation.

CJS 3025 - Police Organization and Administration

4 Credits

This course is designed to be a comprehensive overview of police operations in the United States. The history of police administration and the evolution of policing as a profession will be thoroughly explored. Current and future trends in law enforcement will be discussed in detail. Emphasis will be placed on police personnel issues and the leadership skills required to manage a professional police organization. Topics include principles of organization and management in terms of line, staff, and auxiliary functions, organization of police services, administrative services, operational services, and auxiliary services.

CJS 3030 - Criminal Justice Internship

4 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to apply theory to practice and obtain practical experience with an approved criminal justice agency that is arranged for the student by his/her faculty advisor. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 to be eligible for an internship. The process is begun by the student meeting with the faculty advisor.

CJS 3035 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice

4 Credits

This course provides for directed research and study on an individual basis of a topic of specific interest to the student and in conjunction with a full-time faculty member. Selected topics are explored in conjunction with the guidance and direction of this full- time faculty member. Students interested in conducting such a study must have a minimum of a 2.75 cumulative GPA and must begin the process by meeting with their faculty advisor. Independent Studies may be completed for 1, 2, or 3 credits.

CJS 4001 - Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice

4 Credits

This is the capstone course for the Criminal Justice Studies Program. The purpose of this course is to integrate all academic criminal justice learning, knowledge, and skills in order to provide a total understanding of the criminal justice system and how it applies to the future of the students. Students will demonstrate their abilities to conduct scholarly academic research, employ critical thinking skills, use deductive reasoning. Students will address current issues in criminal justice using analytical skills to frame problems and suggest solutions will be stressed. Oral and written presentations in class will emphasize problem solving techniques and analysis. Ethical, political and social issues that impact criminal justice research will also be examined.

CJS 2099, 3099 or 4099 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice Studies

4 Credits

A special topics course consists of discussion and intensive study of selected topics, issues, problems, and/or writings of prominent criminologists. Such a course enables the criminal justice studies program to address the latest issues in the field of criminal justice. Topics may vary each time the course is run.

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